High on the list of things to do tomorrow is to delve into Canada Online! The Internet, media and emerging technologies: Uses, attitudes, trends and international comparisons 2007. (Link goes to a PDF.)

There’s already been some web comment on it, including a press release that hits some of the highlights (why would a site, in 2008, choose a font that appears to replicate a typewriter?), and a longish post at Newslab (sorry, no author detail available).

I haven’t had a chance to dig into the details yet, but I was amused by the terms the Canadian Internet Project has suggested for reporting on the report.

Excerpted material from publications of the Canadian Internet Project may be cited in media coverage and institutional publications.

Text excerpts and use of data from the 2007 study should be attributed as follows:

Zamaria, Charles and Fred Fletcher. Canada Online! The Internet, media and emerging technologies: Uses, attitudes, trends and international comparisons 2007. Toronto: Canadian Internet Project, 2008.

Subsequent references should be cited as follows:
Zamaria, Fletcher: Canada Online! 2007, Canadian Internet Project

Figures and tables should be attributed in a source line as follows:
Zamaria, Fletcher: Canada Online! 2007, Canadian Internet Project

Text excerpts and use of data from the 2004 study should be attributed in a similar manner, changing title and year of publication where applicable.

Where possible, the following acknowledgement should be provided when reporting results or data from the study:

The Canadian Internet Project is a research initiative of the Canadian Media Research Consortium, under the direction of Charles Zamaria and Fred Fletcher in partnership with the following parties: the Government of Canada (Department of Canadian Heritage, Treasury Board Secretariat), Ontario Media Development Corporation, Telefilm Canada, Interactive Advertising Bureau of Canada, Bell Canada (Bell University Laboratories), eBay, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission.

I figured I’d get that out of the way now. There is a chance I will be publishing excerpts from the report, as is my right under Canadian copyright law. The chances that I’m going to give the full attribution that they suggest, or the acknowledgement, are slim to the point of invisibility.

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