Surfing the web on a rainy Sunday has produced these:

  • video links. Alexandre Gamela shares a bunch of video how-to links that he’s been collecting. Lots of value there.
  • Announcing Flickr Slideshow. Flickr’s slideshow feature has added the ability to plop a video into the photostream and you can (maybe) embed the resulting show in another web site, a nice way to show a portfolio.
  • Poynter Online beta. Poynter’s website gets a long overdue makeover. Definitely easier to navigate and prettier, too.
  • Dealing with the elephant: Build the software you need, then sell it. The fourth in Ryan Sholin’s series on ways newspapers can deal with the changing world. “I heartily recommend you build an extensible Web application for the next unserved need in your organization.”
  • Some thoughts on ‘going local’. A good Doug Fisher piece as we move beyond the mantra “Go hyperlocal,” and start probing what that means to real readers.
  • Yes, people will post news, but perhaps not when YOU ask. Steve Outing’s piece is related, in a way, to Doug Fisher’s as he looks at how real readers want to share their experiences. It’s interesting, as shown by both these pieces, how broad-based concepts (hyperlocal, citizen journalism) are being continually redefined as they run up against reality.
  • Newspapers will not survive despite blind journalistic optimism. Roy Greenslade’s reaction to Vin Crosbie’s gloomy piece on newspapers, includes this: “The problem, as I know well, is that too many journalists react to this kind of material by calling it doom-mongery, as if by recording reality we who have thus far correctly predicted the demise of print are somehow responsible for causing the demise. What journalists need to do instead is take part in the debate rather than go on arguing endlessly that print will survive as, all around them, it is dying.” (I am briefly mentioned in the post, but that’s not why I’m squibing this.)
  • Pew: More people becoming news ‘grazers’. Another take on the recent Pew readership survey, which does not contain particularly good news for newspapers.
  • The incumbent’s solution: 90% transformation, 10% innovation. An excellent piece from Simon Waldman on how disrupted businesses need to approach their futures. He promises a future post on how his ideas apply to newspapers.
  • Moving to Mobile. An extensive Newspaper Association of America guide to mobile news distribution Lots to read and learn from. Via Innovation in College Media.
  • Small Suburban Newspapers Far Less Screwed Than Big Dailies. Not thriving, mind you, but “far less screwed.” As Michael Learmonth writes, that doesn’t give them a pass on potential failure, just more time to get the local market figured out before someone else does.